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Legal Writing Experience

Scalia Law School prides itself on its rigorous Legal Research, Writing, and Analysis (LRWA) program. The LRWA program includes four mandatory semesters of practice oriented legal writing (introduction to legal research, writing, analysis; trial level writing; legal drafting; and appellate writing) and two semesters of scholarly writing. At the end of the second and third semesters, students engage in oral arguments before local practitioners and judges.

Lawyers. We see them on TV, in court rooms, doing a lot of stuff like that. But in reality, most of the work is done outside the courtroom. Most of the work is writing, and research, and analysis. So words are really the tools of our trade. Our legal writing program integrates oral communication as well. We have required oral argument in the first year program, as well as a required oral argument in the second year program.

The Scalia law school has probably the most rigorous writing program in the entire country. It features two years of legal writing, versus the traditional one year. And it puts a very heavy emphasis on persuasive writing, predictive analysis, and also features a drafting contracts sort of a class.

The first-year program has a large lecture and then small sections of 10 to 12 students, guided by writing fellow, who has extensive experience in legal writing.

The law is not easy and it helps to have someone that you can go to, someone who has been in your shoes recently, that can kind of point you in the right direction. The Antonin Scalia law school affords students plenty of opportunity to develop writing samples that they can then give to an employer. These writing samples are truly exemplary. And that very much reflects the two-year program, as opposed to the traditional one-year program.

Becoming a good legal writer is sort of essential to getting a job, keeping a job, advancing in your legal career. I found when people liked my legal writing, they gave me more work, I continued to get work, I continued to get more responsibility because you build that trust.

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